Bye-bye turfgrass. Hello native plants!

In my last post I talked about why to garden with native plants. Well, in an effort to provide food and shelter to wildlife (namely bugs and birds), H and I turned much of the front yard into a native plants garden. To see photos of the yard and all the new baby plants with their common and scientific names, visit EcoStride’s Flickr site.

Here are the steps we took:

  1. Learned about native plants and their requirements (Web sites, books, seminars)
  2. Drew a plan (It was hard to stick to, but you have to start somewhere)
  3. Ripped out lawn with rented sod cutter (You must be very strong to attempt this)
  4. Created border with pavers and added bird bath, large rocks and stepping stones (Hardscaping adds interest and improves the overall impression)
  5. Shopped for plants (A full day of shopping)
  6. Planted trees and shrubs
  7. Spread out wood chips (We had wood chips from a non-native tree we cut down)
  8. Planted native plants
  9. Shopped for plants again to fill in empty spots

May was a busy month of planning and implementing this garden. The portion of lawn we converted to native plants is roughly 450 square feet. If you’re wondering how much we spent on plants (so that you can start planning your own native garden) the answer is $450, so that’s $1 per square foot. We bought 1 small tree, 6 shrubs, and 210 plants. Most of the plants were just little “plugs”. To promote biodiversity we planted 5 species of woody plants, 7 species of grasses, and 39 species of forbs (flowers).

I find it ridiculous that the large, local garden stores sell hardly any native plants. I had to drive 45 minutes for a good selection, which I found at Prairie Restorations and Landscape Alternatives. These companies are committed to native plants and the environment.

Working on such a big project in the front yard can be quite a conversation starter. Neighbors and strangers alike would stop to talk about it. We also found plenty of takers for our old, weedy sod.

I still cannot picture what the yard will look like when these plants grow up, but I’m keeping my fingers crossed. Hopefully next year we can do something similar in the backyard.

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